Looking at the Income Statement and Balance Sheet

Why You Should Be Using Stop Loss and Limit Orders

Investing is a percentage game. The lower you can buy a stock and the higher you can sell, then the more money can be gained. But in reality finding the exact bottom or the exact top of a stock is impossible, and most investors will tell you when to sell is the most difficult decision. The key is to use charts to buy a stock near its 52-week low and then firmly decide when you are going to sell (or buy and hold). Using Stop Loss and Limit orders helps you achieve these goals, and protects you from ...

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Why Dividend Cuts May Be a Good Thing for Investors

Life isn’t perfect and for whatever reason, we purchase stocks we shouldn’t have bought, lured in by the high yield, or still hang on to stocks we should have sold. Investor confidence in a company can be sudden and swift. In the case of TransAlta Corp (TA) for example (which I don’t own) this was pointed out in a recent post by John Heinzl. Management decisions over the sale of the  Sundance coal plants, and the looming threat of a dividend cut have pummelled the stock price. TA closed ...

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trading

Buying Bonds? Think Short Term – The Safety of Short Term Bonds

Bond funds have been out of favor these days, especially with the threat of rising interest rates. With dividend stocks paying juicy yields and returning phenomenal capital appreciation, investors have been reluctant to purchase fixed income securities. Investors forget that when times are good, that all of that can change on a dime! This week the TSX and S&P 500 are already showing signs of a correction, with some dividend stocks off 10% from their highs. This should be a reminder to investors ...

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declining stock price

The Lure and Dangers of High Yield Stocks – What You Need to Know

This article was published in the Canadian MoneySaver and is posted here with permission. For more information visit www.canadianmoneysaver.ca Most investors would never buy a corporate bond yielding 10%. They would understand that a high yield in this low-interest rate environment would be a risky investment. They would likely lose some or all of their investment. But many investors who do not understand the risks of high yield will buy dividend stocks paying 8% or 10%+ yields, double or triple ...

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