Book Giveaway: Cash Cows, Pigs and Jackpots

Congratulations to Brian Gilbert who is the winner. Thanx everyone!

Cash Cows, Pigs and Jackpots is the new book by David Trahair. Many of you may already be familiar with Trahair’s work, as he is the author of the national bestseller Enough Bull. Last December I reviewed David Trahair’s Crushing Debt, and I had nothing but praise and regard for the book!  In fact I still reference David’s work in current posts.

In Cash Cows, Pigs and Jackpots, Trahair brings to light the concept of cash flow. Its really the entire thread that ties the chapters together.  The main areas Trahair starts off with are whether money really buys happiness, what your biggest cash cow really is, and why the banks are getting rich and you aren’t. Trahair also looks at the finances of home ownership and why rent isn’t a four letter word. He  also explains the impact of inflation, your cash cows in retirement such as OAS and CPP, and the inheritance jackpot. As you likely guessed, there is a lot of detailed information packed into this 171 page book. You certainly won’t be reading it cover to cover after dinner. I’m certain everyone will have their own take away after reading the book.

Cows, Pigs and Jackpots

Everyone has a good idea of what a cash cow is. Investopedia defines a cash cow as “a business, product or asset, once acquired and paid off, will produce consistent cash flow over its lifespan.”  Dividend stocks held for the long term, that pay consistent quarterly dividends, is an example of a cash cow.

A cash pig is the opposite of a cash cow. It’s something that consistently drains cash from your pocket, and reduces your cash flow. Mortgage and credit card debt is an example of a cash pig. However for the bank and credit card companies, your cash pig (debt) is a cash cow (income). It’s no wonder banks consider your debt an asset on their balance sheets.

The Importance of Cash Flow

We have all heard the phrase “cash is king.” But as Trahair points out cash isn’t king, cash flow is king!  Businesses understand cash flow as profits from their earnings. Banks certainly understand cash flow from all the interest on your debts. Governments also understand cash flow in the form of taxes they collect. And so do you when you live pay cheque to pay cheque and wonder where all your hard earned dollars went. Trahair writes:

“Banks, brokers, and investment companies make enormous sums of money because they know that cash flow is king. They aren’t making the bulk of their money from investing in the stock market – they are milking it from regular people like you, every minute of every day.”

Pause and think about that for a while… you are a cash cow to the banks and brokers. When  you withdraw money from a bank machine, you may pay a service charge. You probably pay a monthly banking fee. When you buy something with your credit card, and don’t pay off your balance, you are charged interest. When you buy your house or car you are paying interest to the bank each and every month. When you invest in mutual funds you pay commissions, and hidden fees such as MER (Management Expense Ratios) and trailer fees. When you buy stocks you pay a trading commission. Even when you buy something from the store, you likely pay sales tax on it such as the HST. All of these are your cash pigs, but for the government, banks, and brokers its a cash cow.

Every minute of the day you are paying someone else such as a bank, a business, or the government. This what Trahair refers to as cash flow. But its not the type of cash flow that’s a benefit to you, in fact its negative cash flow. What Trahair points out in his new book, is how to identify the cash cows and cash pigs in your everyday life, how to stop being a cash pig to the extent you can, and how to maximize your cash cows!  I’ve enjoyed reading David Trahair’s new book, and I think you will to.

The Book Giveaway

If you’ve read this far, then you have realized this is a book giveaway (there was also a subtle hint in the post title). I’m delighted to announce that John Wiley & Sons has generously provided me an extra copy of Cash Cows, Pigs and Jackpots, by David Trahair.

To keep it simple, and make sure the book is going to someone who really wants it, I’ll only be drawing from readers who post a comment below. I’ll close the comments on Sunday December 9th, 2012. Good luck everyone! :)

Congratulations to Brian Gilbert who is the winner. Thanx everyone!

81 Responses to “Book Giveaway: Cash Cows, Pigs and Jackpots”

  1. Lyne

    Nov 28. 2012

    I hate fees and service charges of any kind! But I’d love to read the book :-) Please count me in for the draw.

  2. DividendGarden

    Nov 28. 2012

    I would like to identify cash cows & cash pigs. Please count me in!

  3. Jason S

    Nov 28. 2012

    This book seems interesting! I’m allergic to fees and charges, I try to avoid them as much as I can. This book could provide me with even more arguments to convince my loved ones to do the same thing! Count me in for the draw, please :)

  4. Dan R

    Nov 28. 2012

    Bacon yes, Pigs no. Would love a chance to win this one!

  5. andy

    Nov 28. 2012

    I also can’t stand fees ,bank ,cc ,or mutual fund fees especialy, I think I’ve done well to avoid paying these, but I can use all the help I can get!

  6. Ken

    Nov 28. 2012

    A very useful book and one that will be passed on to my 20s daughter as well. Please enter me in the draw…

  7. Gavin

    Nov 28. 2012

    Very nice review. Looking forward to checking out this book

  8. andysterdam

    Nov 28. 2012

    I’d love to read the book. Please enter me as well!

  9. armaan

    Nov 28. 2012

    Like to read the book, please count me in

  10. Rosalie Banal

    Nov 28. 2012

    Seems like a great read…please count me in. Thanks.

  11. kim a

    Nov 28. 2012

    This sounds like it may have a lot of useful information. Thanks for the opportunity.

  12. Jay coffsky

    Nov 28. 2012

    Would love to read

  13. Kitt

    Nov 28. 2012

    You can never be too aware of the cash that flows away from you. Please enter me in the draw.

  14. brian gilbert

    Nov 28. 2012

    Every time I buy a book like this, easy reading, informative and down to earth my daughter (35yrs) takes it home with her even if I havn’t finished it. I now have to hide them till I am done. Still looking for The Wealthy Barber Returns. Read every article and book by David Trahair I see and look forward to The Dividend Ninja every week.

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Nov 29. 2012

      Brian thank you! Consider it a good thing your daughter does indeed take such an interest in personal finance and investing. Not such a bad deal for a missing book or two. ;)

      Cheers

  15. Marvin

    Nov 28. 2012

    Please cast my ballot! =)

  16. Mike

    Nov 28. 2012

    Please enter me for the draw. Thanks

  17. Brian

    Nov 28. 2012

    I would love to read this book. Count me in.

  18. Claude Internoscia

    Nov 28. 2012

    Would like to learn a lot from this book. Thanks.

  19. Mick

    Nov 28. 2012

    Please enter me in your giveaway contest! Always eager to read a new book and learn tips!!

  20. Nicole A

    Nov 28. 2012

    This books sounds really interesting. My husband and I are both wanting to check it out, thanks for the info…I’ve really appreciated reading your blog as a newbie dividend investor!

  21. Alden Tyrell

    Nov 28. 2012

    Count me in. Thanks.

  22. Jesse

    Nov 28. 2012

    My wife passed this post along to me and I’d really be interested in checking out this book!

  23. Jimmy

    Nov 28. 2012

    great blog .
    keep up the great work!

  24. Be'en

    Nov 28. 2012

    Yes, I want this book!… Buying it would result in cash-outflow!

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Nov 29. 2012

      Ha, that’s funny! But this book might give you one or two great ideas that turn into cash cows. Good luck Be’en! :)

  25. Ian

    Nov 28. 2012

    Really need to create some positive cash flow. Please enter me in the draw.

  26. Avrex

    Nov 28. 2012

    Count me in. :o

  27. Sounds like a great book! Count me in!

  28. wayne

    Nov 28. 2012

    Was just downsized…retired?
    Now I hope the years of saving and planning will pay off.
    if so, I am retired at 54
    need all the help I can get!

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Nov 30. 2012

      Wayne, I have no doubt that all those years of savings and planning will ineed pay off! :)

      Cheers

  29. Steve P

    Nov 28. 2012

    Would love to read it – please keep up the great work Ninja!

  30. Michel

    Nov 29. 2012

    I would really appreciate a copy of this book, as I’m slowly building a stable of cash cows i.e. dividends :) Thank you very much!

  31. Alan S

    Nov 29. 2012

    Sounds like a great read!

  32. Ed

    Nov 29. 2012

    Can’t wait to read it.

  33. Drmchsr66

    Nov 29. 2012

    Hi DN,
    I hope the book contains useful info to further increase my knowledge.
    I no longer pay any bank fees.
    Drmchsr66

  34. Abbie D

    Nov 29. 2012

    Sounds like a terrific book. One that will never go out of style

  35. Mandy @MoneyMasterMom

    Nov 29. 2012

    Sounds like a great read!

  36. Derek @ Freeat33

    Nov 29. 2012

    The picture of being milked by our banker isn’t so pleasant. Although I haven’t paid fees in years so she probably doesn’t bother trying to milk me anymore :)

  37. Bill

    Nov 29. 2012

    Looks like an interesting read. Please include me in the draw.

  38. paul G

    Nov 29. 2012

    Would love a chance to win that book – it’s right up my alley !

  39. Doug C

    Nov 30. 2012

    I’ve never read any of David’s previous work. It seems right up there with what I tell my clients about how money works. Can’t wait to read it.

  40. David R

    Nov 30. 2012

    This is the kind of book i need to READ!

  41. shelly n

    Nov 30. 2012

    Sounds interesting, I’d love to win this book!

  42. Amanda

    Nov 30. 2012

    Surprisingly, a student like myself has a positive cash flows through GIC’s, investments, and certain stocks. Soon than later, I will have a cash cow due to my interest in property investment in mid-size cities. For the most part, I would like to identify which are ‘cash cows’ and ‘Cash Pigs’. Add me in!

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Dec 01. 2012

      Amanda, if you are student and you have positive cash flow, then you are doing very well indeed! I think you aready know which are cash cows or cash pigs. However take my small RRSP loan which at the moment is a cash pig, but will be a cash cow when paid off in a few months. :)

      Cheers

  43. Mikael

    Dec 01. 2012

    This is a book I’d love to read please count me in, and keep up the good job.

  44. David G

    Dec 01. 2012

    Does it get into dividend stocks as a cash cow? Especially dividend growing stocks? Count me in. I promise to do a book report or theme on it after winning.

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Dec 01. 2012

      Daivd, no it’s not a dividend investing book, it’s a personal finance book. Please see my resources page for some useful links on dividend investing specifically. ;)

      Cheers

  45. The Dividend Engineer

    Dec 01. 2012

    Cash Flow is indeed king. I would even add, Positive Cash Flow is king. I think that more people need to understand the concept of cash flow. Books like this one are there to help! Happy week-end everyone!

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Dec 01. 2012

      Dividend Engineer, I couldn’t have said it better! Your’e right “Positive” Cash Flow is King. ;)

      Cheers

  46. Marc

    Dec 01. 2012

    Sounds like a great book – count me in!

  47. Curtis

    Dec 02. 2012

    Sounds like a great book!

  48. Christine

    Dec 02. 2012

    I would love to get this book. I just read Crushing Debt and it was a major eye opener. I learned so much.

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Dec 02. 2012

      Christine, if you liked Crushing Debt, then you will like this book too! Good luck. ;)

  49. Dan Mac

    Dec 03. 2012

    Hey Dividend Ninja I’d be interested in winning a copy of Cash Cows! I always like a good personal finance book to read through.

  50. ThePaperboy

    Dec 03. 2012

    Hey, would love to get my hands on this one. Count me in =)

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Dec 03. 2012

      ThePaperBoy, nice to see you back! I haven’t seen you around the dividend blogs in a while. ;)

  51. Jason

    Dec 03. 2012

    That’ll do pig, that’ll do.

  52. Ron @runningfromdebt

    Dec 03. 2012

    It’s interesting how one word “flow” can change the meaning of the statement: cash flow is king. I see how banks and other businesses see the consumer as cash cows because we are continually providing them with positive cash flow.

    The books seems like a very interesting read and hopefully I can get my hands on a copy soon!

  53. Rafa

    Dec 03. 2012

    nice review – I’d like a copy!

  54. Ramona

    Dec 04. 2012

    Read both previous books & they are fab! What a great Christmas gift. Thanks for the opportunity.

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Dec 04. 2012

      Ramona, I haven’t read David’s other book Enough Bull, but I think I should. :)

      Cheers

  55. Sridhar

    Dec 05. 2012

    Hi Dividend Ninja,
    The book looks interesting and the brief article by you clearly shows how most financial institutions make money from their large customer base and not so much from their trading or investments. Today technology has brought equity and other forms of investing right in the hands of investor, while financial institutions or brokers still provide a platform and charge brokerage.
    However, there are good institutions who help investors as well and they deserve credit for it. But all said and done investors have to have a focus on investing in reputed companies or stocks to get consistent returns.

    I’ve started investing in NASDAQ 100 ETF a few months ago. What are your views or comments on this strategy ?
    I believe its a good way to get exposure to the tech universe in a diversified fashion at low cost.
    Thanks

  56. Ilona

    Dec 05. 2012

    I am a newly single mother who is starting to plan for retirement, and am very interested in identifying dividend stocks that will give me a comfortable, reliable source of income in my retirement. I truly never expect to stop working (I’m a writer) but the wisdom of my elders (who lived largely on the proceeds from their dividends in their later years) is starting to speak to me now that I am entering middle age. Dividends will be an important part of my portfolio, though I am not invested in any right now. I would love to read this book and learn how to pick the right stocks to add to my growing portfolio.

  57. Dee

    Dec 08. 2012

    Sounds like a useful book. I’d love to win a copy.

  58. Doug

    Dec 08. 2012

    Sounds like an informative read. Chance are freeat33n would give it an essential rating. Thx

  59. Noel

    Dec 09. 2012

    Sounds interesting!

  60. Phyllis

    Dec 09. 2012

    I just started working and i’m planning on buying a property. But with the limited funds my bf and I have, it’s imperative that we spend our money wisely. Thank you for the review and I’d like to enter in for the draw.
    Thanks.

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Dec 09. 2012

      Phyllis, you and ur BF are ahead of the game. Many people don’t even take the first step of spending wisely, and watching their cash flow. Sounds like U guys are on the right track!

      Cheers

  61. I like the idea of cash flow and cash cows. That is what got me hooked on dividend investing in the first place. Thank you for your review of the book, I would place it on my watchlist.

    • The Dividend Ninja

      Dec 11. 2012

      DGI, thanx for dropping by. ;) It’s a fun book, you will enjoy it… I agree with you about cash flow and dividends.

      Cheers

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  2. Weekend Links – December already?? - November 30th, 2012

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